Q&A with Bait-Tech’s Andy Neal


Q&A with Bait-Tech’s Andy Neal

Darren, from Wigan, asks:

27.08.13_1I have just started fishing the pellet waggler and it’s going okay but there’s just one thing that I would like the answer to. When fishing the pellet waggler does your line from your rod to your float sit on the surface of the water or do you sink it? I hope you can put an end to the little problem that I’m having.

A little difficult to explain in short, but both floating and sinking line can have an advantage in the right situation. A floating mainline will be of use when there is little or no wind or you are fishing very shallow where bites will be instant as the float lands. This will give you direct contact with the float and the hook as there won’t be any drag on the line. When you strike you will be in direct touch.

27.08.13_2This can cause problems when there is a strong skim or wind on the water though, or when fishing a little deeper and you have to wait for the rig to fall and present a bait. Then it can be better to cast past where you need to be fishing and sink the line and in doing so pull the rig into the desired area. This will cut the line under the surface away from the wind and enable the float and rig to sit properly without being dragged out of position. This will give you vital extra seconds of presentation which although may not sound much, it will be evident by the extra few fish you catch.

I personally use a line that will sink all the time as if you are catching very shallow the bites come so quick that you don’t have chance to sink the line anyway. The biggest thing to think about when pellet waggler fishing is the feeding. It’s this that will catch you more fish and a steady stream of pellets will see you catch well.

I like to feed 4-6 8mm Bait-Tech Carp and Course pellets every 30 seconds. This regularity then lets me search the depths to find out exactly what depth the fish want to feed at. The loud attractive noise made by the large pellets means you can get away with feeding less yet still create good attraction. This then leads to the fish competing for food and becoming easier to catch.

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